Happy Pride, everyone!

I just wanted to put something out there that addresses questions I inevitably see every year. Can straight people go to Pride? Kinksters? Ace people? Kids? Who’s it for?

The short answer is that Pride is a place for every single person who doesn’t identify as cisgender and heterosexual- and some of our cishet friends too.

The long answer is:

I think the assumption of whether straight people should go makes and encourages a lot of assumptions. See a couple that looks like a man and a woman? Well, they might not be straight. One or both…


This post assumes you already understand why misgendering Caitlyn Jenner, even if you don’t like her, is wrong. That’s not what we’re talking about. If you want someone to engage with you on that topic, you’ll have to look everywhere else on the internet where that conversation is happening.

This is another one of those posts I hoped I would never have to make. I can’t stand having to defend Caitlyn Jenner in any way, to be honest. …


Let me first address the elephant in the room:

My keyboard is a bit broken so if you’ve ever seen a bunch of typos in my stuff, I’m sorry but that’s why. It bugs me too but it’s impossible for me to catch all of them and still have any kind of output. Anyway, on to the story.

I woke up today, looked out of my window, and saw that it’s still dark and rainy outside. So much for waking up today with the sun streaming in through my window to invigorate me on this greatest day of partying. But…


Since I guess I have to, I’m going to talk today about something I never wanted to talk about on this medium (pun intended): dating preferences. If you’re reading this, please understand I’m just a single person and don’t represent the opinions of transgender and metagender people as a whole. We’re not a hivemind.

I also won’t be linking to the many social media posts by these so-called super straights. I won’t be responsible for giving them even one more click. If you’re confused and want some background, though, I’d highly recommend checking out Jammidodger’s video on the topic. …


I just wanted to write a little something about a change I’ve noticed. I want to preface this by saying that I’m happy that nonbinary people have gotten more visibility in the last few years. I think It’s an important step towards eventual equality and equity. But today I want to talk about a way in which that visibility has had a potentially negative effect on people who are just coming into their nonbinary identity.

It used to be, in ye olde three or four years ago, that if you came across a new pronoun set you could google it…


I’m currently in the process of interviewing for jobs. Like many others trying to get a foot in the door in a career, I’m extremely nervous about the whole thing. Fortunately, I’ve found some social groups to be part of where I feel I can ask questions and get good answers and I am grateful to have found communities of support.

Something I’ve noticed, though, is that sometimes commentors aren’t the most helpful.

To work with a recent example, I posed a question in a social group recently asking for advice for what to wear for a first interview. I…


There’s a recurring conversation that I want to unpack a little bit. This conversation involves cisgender people who want to experiment with using different pronoun sets and their reasons for doing so. In my opinion, there’s no clear-cut answer on whether this is problematic or not, but I do think there are motivations that are inappropriate.

Firstly, I want to affirm that pronouns do not have a gender. There are trends (example, she/her is generally related to feminine gender identity), but these trends are not law. There can be men and women (trans, cis, or meta), who use they or…


As promised, here are a few thoughts about transmasculine and transfeminine as labels. Disclaimer: if you are a person who uses these words to describe yourself and you find it empowering, I’m glad for you. This piece does not apply to you. As with most content I have up so far, this is explicitly for cisgender people and their relationship with these terms.

Here we go, time to make this personal again.

It took me a very long time to come out. I began to think of myself as nonbinary almost as soon as I learned the word, probably late…


First of all, I want to congratulate Elliot Page on coming out. Welcome to the big trans family. Please note that Elliot uses both he and they pronouns so I’ll be switching between those where appropriate.

Over the course of the day, I’ve been so happy to see so many news outlets responding positively to their coming out post. It seems that, generally, they have gotten a kind response from the masses and that does a lot to warm up my cynical, nonbinary heart.

However, I have noticed a glaring problem in most of the coverage: they keep dead naming…


Hello everyone. I’m nonbinary. I’m not going to tell you what my assigned sex at birth was. I’m not going to be talking about my transition goals because, frankly, I don’t have any.

Something I’ve struggled with since before coming out is the overbearing expectation that I would transition, an expectation that I wholesale reject as a requirement for being noncis (noncis meaning, not cisgender). …

Lee Crowell

BA in medieval and Renaissance studies. MLS. They/them/theirs.

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